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Volume 10 No. 07
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Accepted Papers
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Scientific Investigations

Short Duration of Sleep Is Associated with Elevated High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Level in Taiwanese Adults: A Cross-Sectional Study

http://dx.doi.org/10.5664/jcsm.3862

Jui-Kun Chiang, M.D., M.Sc.
Department of Family Medicine, Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan

Background:

Elevated plasma levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) have been associated with increased adverse health outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of sleep duration with risk of elevated hs-CRP levels in Taiwanese adults.

Methods:

We examined the association between sleep duration and hs-CRP in 353 healthy adults recruited from the physical examination center at a regional hospital in southern Taiwan. Elevated hs-CRP was defined as a plasma level ≥ 0.20 mg/dL. Short sleep duration was defined as ≤ 5.5 h per day. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association of short duration of sleep with elevated hs-CRP levels.

Results:

In this study, short duration of sleep (odds ratio [OR] = 2.20; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.11-4.30), aged 70 years or older (OR = 4.58; 95% CI: 1.70-12.66), menopause (OR = 2.81; 95% CI: 1.52-5.3), higher heart rate (OR = 1.38; 95% CI: 1.10-1.75), higher body mass index (OR = 1.20; 95% CI: 1.09-1.34), higher white blood cell count (OR = 1.38; 95% CI: 1.14-1.66), and higher uric acid level (OR = 1.31; 95% CI: 1.06-1.63) were significantly associated with an increased risk of elevated hs-CRP levels.

Conclusions:

In this study of healthy Taiwanese adults, short duration of sleep was significantly associated with elevated hs-CRP levels. Activation of pro-inflammatory pathways might represent a mechanism by which short sleep duration affects health.

Citation:

Chiang JK. Short duration of sleep is associated with elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level in Taiwanese adults: a cross-sectional study. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(7):743-749.




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